My Car Quest

July 4, 2020

An Unusual 1964 Ferrari 250 GTO At The Ferrari Museum

by Mike –

I have never seen a Ferrari 250 GTO quite like this one. Since it is in the Ferrari Museum I assume it is a real one.

P1070474

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1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

It reminds me of a 250 LM from the rear.

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO gas cap

I wonder if it has the Ferrari Classiche certification? Maybe it doesn’t need it.

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO wheel

1964 Ferrari 250 GTO

A stunning car. I would love to take it out for a drive – how about you?

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Ferrari 250 GTO

Comments

  1. I think, from memory, that there were 3 or 4 of these “64 GTO” styled cars built. Sir Anthony Bamford owns one over here in the UK, which is raced quite regularly. Personally, I don’t like the styling nearly as much as the “regular” GTO (if there is such a thing!). There are echoes of the 250LM in the rear buttresses of the cabin. For that matter, the adulation of the 250LM I don’t get, either – stubby, purposeful, yes. Beautiful – well, hardly. While I’m sounding off, I’ve always thought that the 250GTO would be an even more beautiful car if you lopped a couple of inches off the top of the windscreen to give a lower roofline. To me, the cabin is too tall, and lowering the roofline would give a much sleeker profile. Find a profile shot of the GTO and try it, and see if you don’t agree. Sacrilege, I know!
    Chris

  2. Hi there, following your great page since some time … this example of a 64´ GTO might be chassis number #4675 … “long roof” version without spoiler … one of 4 cars transfered form series 1 250 GTOs to series 2 GTOs.

    http://www.kidston.com/kidston-news-item/146/Friends-Reunited:-Jean-Guichet-meets-Ferrari-250-GTO

    best wishes,
    Seb

    do not forget to visit my (modern) GT racing page on facebook 😉 http://www.gts-publishing.com

  3. The joys of individual coach-building of cars.
    I recall a video made of compilations of GTO racing in the days.
    Three GTOs at the track, and the owner of one explaining that all had the same body shell but all different for air intake ducts, side vents for engine air extraction, indicator lenses and such.
    This LM styled GTO is very different to the others, perhaps why it made it into the museum.

  4. This GTO would of been one of the last ones built, now called the series 2, they were mainly different in the roof, referred to as a flying buttress. There were 6 or 7 of this body type built by Pininfarina, of the total of 39. Most of them were built in ’64 at the end of the model run.

  5. Grifo4me says

    I think Alain de Cadenet drives one of these in his car series

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