My Car Quest

May 23, 2019

The Apollo GT Spyder

by Mike –

The Apollo GT was produced and sold by International Motor Cars in Oakland, California. Altogether 76 coupes, 11 Spyders and the prototype 2+2 were produced for a total of 88 Apollos built between 1961 and 1965.

Of the 11 Spyders made 4 were at Concorso Italiano this past August in Monterey, California. They were all dark blue as you can see in these photos.

Apollo GT Spyder

The front of the Spyder looks the same as the Coupe

Apollo GT Spyder

The rear of the Spyder is quite different than the Coupe

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Spyder

When some car models are converted from a coupe to a convertible version the manufacture merely cuts off the top and maybe adds some lateral stability to make up for no roof.

The Apollo GT Spyder looks like a different car from the rear than the Coupe version. See the comparisons below, it appears that every panel on the rear is different.

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Coupe

Apollo GT Coupe

Apollo GT Spyder

The entire rear of the car is completely redesigned; the bumpers look the same, the tail lights look different to me but maybe not and the trunk lid is totally different.

The Spyder looks more Italian to me than the Coupe.

Apollo GT Coupe

Apollo GT Coupe

Apollo GT Spyder

The Spyder has the same beautiful interior as the Coupe and the same great Buick engine.

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Spyder

Apollo GT Spyder

 

Connecting Buyers With Sellers Of Classic Cars – All On-Line 

Click here to learn more.

 

Summary
product image
Author Rating
1star1star1star1star1star
Aggregate Rating
5 based on 2 votes
Brand Name
Apollo
Product Name
Apollo GT Spyder

Comments

  1. I believe the blue convertible and a blue coupe were found in a storage container about ten or fifteen years ago. An amazing barn find.

  2. Robb Northrup says

    Mike, thanks again for “coverage” of the Apollo. Regarding the convertibles:

    – The rear is totally different. Scaglione made the fender line about an inch-and-a-half higher so there would be a slight “trough” between the fender and the rear deck lid. He also moved the tail lights out about 2 1-2 inches to line up with the sweeping fender line. On the first convertible (no. 2001 now owned by Geo. Finley), the rear bumper is lower than on the coupes, and subsequent convertibles.

    – The “storage container” story: Actually, four bodies were left at the Long Beach docks after Apollo Int’l, successor to International Motor Cars, went under. They went unclaimed for years until Ken Dumiere bought them. He never got the convertibles assembled. One (2010) ended up with Robb Phillips in Portland, who finished off the car for Bob Olson (the black upholstered car at the Concorso). The other was picked up by Milt Brown, and sat for years in the garage of one of his rentals in Berkeley. It perished in the 1991 (?) Oakland fire.

    One coupe was assembled into a running car, which Milt Brown eventually purchased, a green coupe now owned by Bill Larson in Wisconsin.

    The fate of the other coupe is unkown.

    I wish I could have taken you for a spin in one of the Apollos at Concorso. They are incredible cars to drive, with that excellent Buick Special suspension.

    Robb

  3. That green coupe was previously owned by Chip, it was in sold in a Monterey aution in 2008 during the 1st Concorso I attended where I met him. That car sold for $78,500 +10% buyers premium if memory serves.

    Apollos were designed and meant to be driven!

    I’m enjoying every mile.

    Don

  4. Luciano Wehking says

    Thanks for the read

Speak Your Mind

*